Israel Tour Sites

Israel's Main Cities

Tel Aviv, Israel

Tel Aviv, a city on Israel’s Mediterranean coast, is marked by stark 1930s Bauhaus buildings, thousands of which are clustered in the White City architectural area. Museums include Beit Hatfutsot, whose multimedia exhibits illustrate the history of Jewish communities worldwide. The Eretz Israel Museum covers the country’s archaeology, folklore and crafts, and features an on-site excavation of 12th-century-B.C. ruins.

Jerusalem, Israel

Jerusalem is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Sea of Galilee, Israel

The Sea of Galilee, Kinneret or Kinnereth, Lake of Gennesaret, or Lake Tiberias, is a freshwater lake in Israel. It is approximately 53 km in circumference, about 21 km long, and 13 km wide. Its area is 166.7 km² at its fullest, and its maximum depth is approximately 43 m (141 feet). At levels between 215 metres (705 ft) and 209 metres (686 ft) below sea level, it is the lowest freshwater lake on Earth and the second-lowest lake in the world (after the Dead Sea, a saltwater lake).[6] The lake is fed partly by underground springs although its main source is the Jordan River which flows through it from north to south.

Beersheba, Israel

Beersheba, also Be’er Sheva (/bɪərˈʃbə/Hebrewבְּאֵר שֶׁבַע Be’er Sheva, is the largest city in the Negev desert of southern Israel. Often referred to as the “Capital of the Negev”, it is the center of the fourth most populous metropolitan area in Israel, the eighth most populous Israeli city with a population of 207,551, and the second largest city with a total area of 117,500 dunams (after Jerusalem).

Eilat, Israel

Eilat (/ˈlɑːt/Hebrew: is Israel‘s southernmost city, a busy port and popular resort at the northern tip of the Red Sea, on the Gulf of Aqaba. The city’s beaches, coral reef, nightlife and desert landscapes make it a popular destination for domestic and international tourism.

Home to 50,724 people, Eilat is part of the Southern Negev Desert, at the southern end of the Arava, adjacent to the Egyptian village of Taba to the south, the Jordanian port city of Aqaba to the east, and within sight of Saudi Arabia to the south-east, across the gulf.

Eilat’s arid desert climate and low humidity are moderated by proximity to a warm sea. Temperatures often exceed 40 °C (104 °F) in summer, and 21 °C (70 °F) in winter, while water temperatures range between 20 and 26 °C (68 and 79 °F). Eilat averages 360 sunny days a year.

Old Jaffa

The Old City is home to winding alleys filled with craft shops and art galleries, and stalls selling antiques and jewelry at the lively Jaffa Flea Market. Ottoman-era landmarks include the Clock Tower and St. Peter’s Church, while the Ilana Goor Museum shows Israeli and international art. The area is also popular for its hip wine bars, creative Mediterranean dining and seafood restaurants near Jaffa Port.

Haifa, Israel

Haifa is a northern Israeli port city built in tiers extending from the Mediterranean up the north slope of Mount Carmel. The city’s most iconic sites are the immaculately landscaped terraces of the Bahá’í Gardens and, at their heart, the gold-domed Shrine of the Báb. At the foot of the gardens lies the German Colony, with shops, galleries and restaurants in 19th-century buildings.

Tiberias, Israel

Tiberias (/tˈbɪəriəs/Hebrewטְבֶרְיָה‬, TveryaArabicطبرية‎, Ṭabariyyah) is an Israeli city on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee. Established around 20 CE, it was named in honour of the second emperor of the Roman Empire, Tiberius.In 2017 it had a population of 43,664.

Tiberias was held in great respect in Judaism from the middle of the 2nd century CE and since the 16th century has been considered one of Judaism‘s Four Holy Cities, along with JerusalemHebron and Safed. In the 2nd–10th centuries, Tiberias was the largest Jewish city in the Galilee and the political and religious hub of the Jews of Israel. Its immediate neighbour to the south, Hammat Tiberias, which is now part of modern Tiberias, has been known for its hot springs, believed to cure skin and other ailments, for some two thousand years.

Acre, Israel

Acre (/ˈɑːkər/ or /ˈkər/, Hebrew: עַכּוֹ‬, ʻAko, most commonly spelled as Akko;  is a city in the coastal plain region of Israel’s Northern District at the extremity of Haifa Bay. The city occupies an important location, as it sits on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, traditionally linking the waterways and commercial activity with the Levant.[3] The important land routes meeting here are the north–south one following the coast and the road cutting inland through the Jezreel Valley; Acre also benefits from one of the very rare natural harbours on the coast of the Land of Israel. This location helped it become one of the oldest cities in the world, continuously inhabited since the Middle Bronze Age, some 4,000 years ago.

Acre is the holiest city of the Bahá’í Faith and receives many Baha’i pilgrims. In 2017, the population was 48,303.[1] Acre is a mixed city that includes Jews, Muslims, Christians, Druze, and Baha’is.

Caesarea, Israel

Caesarea (Hebrewקֵיסָרְיָה‬, Keysariya is a town in north-central Israel. The town was built by Herod the Great about 25–13 BCE as the port city Caesarea Maritima. It served as an administrative center of Judaea Province of the Roman Empire, and later the capital of the Byzantine Palaestina Prima province during the classic period. Following the Muslim conquest in the 7th century, in which it was the last city to fall to the Arabs, the city had an Arab majority until Crusader conquest. It was diminished after the Mamluk conquest. In 1884, Bosniak immigrants settled there in a small fishing village. In 1940, kibbutz Sdot Yam was established next to the village. In February 1948 the village was conquered by a Palmach unit commanded by Yitzhak Rabin, its people already having fled following an attack by the Lehi. In 1952, a Jewish town of Caesarea was established near the ruins of the old city, which were made into the national park of Caesarea Maritima.